I love having Followers, Thank You

Monday, May 16, 2011

Nunnery, Sacred Heart of Mary

hill towards cemeteryLooking down the hill you see a cemetery. If you drove through or walked through this cemetery you'd see lots of Polish names. The red brick building on the left is "The Nunnery". My daughter lived there for 2 years. No, she's not a Nun. In 1925 Father Stanislaus Wikarski saw the need for a new Parish in Dundalk (Baltimore, Maryland) to administer to the every growing Polish population in the area. The area had been called Graceland Park Area. The population was growing due to workers needed for Bethlehem Steel, and large numbers of people working and living at Fort Holabird, a military installation.
ParishSuitable land was found and construction began in January of 1926. A school with 9 classrooms, housing for The Sisters, and Church were constructed. In June of 1927, Sisters from Pennsylvania arrived and school began with 5 students the following September. Above picture is the current Parish.
stain glass windowBy 1950, 600 pupils in 11 classrooms were being taught by The Sisters. In 1959 a new Convent was built. Through additional growth, more building was needed. In June of 1965 a new building housing 24 classrooms, a library, nurse facility, faculty work rooms, and offices was constructed. Enrollment stayed high throught the 50's, 60's, and 70's averaging 500-600 students. (above picture is one of the small but pretty stained glass windows in the chapel at The Nunery.)
dining roomIn 1980 Fort Holabird closed, and the decline in enrollment was noticed. Bethlehem steel closed, and futher loss in enrollment took place. By the 90's enrollment barely reached 300. Grade level classes were combined in an effort to save money. In 1999 The Sisters of Holy Family of Nazareth left the school and closed the convent. This ended their long dedicated service to the community of 73 years. (large dining room in the convent/nunnery).
ChapelA program similar to Teach America called Operation Teach run by The Catholic Church serves many under privileged areas in Baltimore. In exchange for their education, teachers teach in need based areas for 2 years. They're paid a small stipend and live in community housing like this closed Convent/Nunnery. The teachers pay rent to The Parish. The birth of Catholic Education began in Baltimore, and so the tradition of educating the masses continues.

**This is my N post for Z-A Challenge**

5 comments:

  1. HI SANDY,
    I LOVE YOUR POST, VERY INTERESTING.
    SO SAD IT HAD TO CLOSE. HOW LUCKY YOUR DAUGHTER GOT TO GO. YOUR PHOTOS ARE VERY NICE. HAVE A GREAT WEEK. RIZZI

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Catholic school in my town closed its doors a few years back, with many of the kids transferring to the one in the next town. enrollment i both schools was down, but combined, the one is booming.

    I’m more than half way done blogging my way back from Z to A. :O) Middle of Everything

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for the visits Rizzi and Word Nerd. The schools are so needed in so many areas, an affordable alternative to expensive private and safer then many public schools, such a shame. Glad they keep trying though by combining, maybe things will turn around some.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very interesting!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks hakucho, I find the stories behind things fascinating.

    ReplyDelete

NO Google+ Profile Links please. Comments with name and url, or hyperlinks will be returned.

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin